• Pragerisms

    For a more comprehensive list of Pragerisms visit
    Dennis Prager Wisdom.

    • "The left is far more interested in gaining power than in creating wealth."
    • "Without wisdom, goodness is worthless."
    • "I prefer clarity to agreement."
    • "First tell the truth, then state your opinion."
    • "Being on the Left means never having to say you're sorry."
    • "If you don't fight evil, you fight gobal warming."
    • "There are things that are so dumb, you have to learn them."
  • Liberalism’s Seven Deadly Sins

    • Sexism
    • Intolerance
    • Xenophobia
    • Racism
    • Islamophobia
    • Bigotry
    • Homophobia

    A liberal need only accuse you of one of the above in order to end all discussion and excuse himself from further elucidation of his position.

  • Glenn’s Reading List for Die-Hard Pragerites

    • Bolton, John - Surrender is not an Option
    • Bruce, Tammy - The Thought Police; The New American Revolution; The Death of Right and Wrong
    • Charen, Mona - DoGooders:How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help
    • Coulter, Ann - If Democrats Had Any Brains, They'd Be Republicans; Slander
    • Dalrymple, Theodore - In Praise of Prejudice; Our Culture, What's Left of It
    • Doyle, William - Inside the Oval Office
    • Elder, Larry - Stupid Black Men: How to Play the Race Card--and Lose
    • Frankl, Victor - Man's Search for Meaning
    • Flynn, Daniel - Intellectual Morons
    • Fund, John - Stealing Elections
    • Friedman, George - America's Secret War
    • Goldberg, Bernard - Bias; Arrogance
    • Goldberg, Jonah - Liberal Fascism
    • Herson, James - Tales from the Left Coast
    • Horowitz, David - Left Illusions; The Professors
    • Klein, Edward - The Truth about Hillary
    • Mnookin, Seth - Hard News: Twenty-one Brutal Months at The New York Times and How They Changed the American Media
    • Morris, Dick - Because He Could; Rewriting History
    • O'Beirne, Kate - Women Who Make the World Worse
    • Olson, Barbara - The Final Days: The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House
    • O'Neill, John - Unfit For Command
    • Piereson, James - Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism
    • Prager, Dennis - Think A Second Time
    • Sharansky, Natan - The Case for Democracy
    • Stein, Ben - Can America Survive? The Rage of the Left, the Truth, and What to Do About It
    • Steyn, Mark - America Alone
    • Stephanopolous, George - All Too Human
    • Thomas, Clarence - My Grandfather's Son
    • Timmerman, Kenneth - Shadow Warriors
    • Williams, Juan - Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It
    • Wright, Lawrence - The Looming Tower

Dem Fake News Folks reported from realclearpolitics

Trump: ‘We Learned a Lot’ From Health Care Debacle

by Alexis Simendinger  at realclearpolitics:

Dear readers:  Lefty Alexis represents reporting from the fascistic wing of American politics these days, the  Democratic Party now led by Schumer, Pelosi, Franken, Blumenthal, and feminists of all sexes, colors, shapes and sizes A through Z demanding every American be made equal along with 20,000,000 leftist illegal invaders.

Read carefully each sentence and the in between printed below at rcp.  Which of them bear any Truth whatsoever?  That Donald J. Truth, now President, said “We learned a lot from the health care debacle”, I am guessing, is one, perhaps the only bit of Truth woven into the article.

But, was it a debacle?   Do you think for a moment Our Donald has given up on the matter?    Think of  the collapse of ObamaCare, both in exercise and in finance, as a piece of property in the free market, property not cherished in particular because of its own value, but vital to own for its location.

In a fascist state,  the one cherished today by the feminists, black racists,  the invading Hispanics and the  homespun   Jewish habitual  Left, all   now controlling the  American university and school,  whose every vote local or national,  legal or illegal,  Democrats need to fulfill their single-Party dictatorship already achieved in  California, controlling the language is essential in building a united, obedient, uneducated  population mass dependent upon the State, for voting fodder.

Read carefully the following article typical of most things written for rcp readings.    What is cherished?   What is really True?  Who are the winners and losers.  Where is the proof?

Was the GOP withdrawal  of the Paul Ryan ObamaCare replacement bill a disaster or mere propaganda?  for whom?  Pick out the sentences, the put downs, are they true?  ObamaCare is the health plan leftist Democrats worship.   Do you think for a moment Our Donald Trump won’t campaign to remind the world of its cancers and who arranged them as health care?

Today’s American press coverage of the Trump administration thus far is written  by SINGLE PARTY PREY…..that is, these propagandists are products of the leftist gangs running Journalism Departments and school from American coast to American coast.

Leading fascist of my younger days of life was stilted, snooty, boring, pompous, arrogant, single party leftist, Ted Koppel, at ABC of the then less dishonorable Democratic Party in America .  I was a Democrat then.  He was reliably repelling as an pompous ass, and  I suspect he still is.   Yet, I feel good from him for his shortcomings were so overwhelming,  he helped me discover Ronald Reagan.

American journalists are programmed to be mindless beyond their leftism.   Back in my radio years, I remember yawning listening to H.V. Kaltenborn, the Republican clone of  that Ted but far more boring than arrogant.   Besides, rainy evenings caused static on radio during the War years.  One couldn’t tell the difference between the static and H.V.’s tones from speech, perhaps a reason why so many folks were Democrats then.

Trump: ‘We Learned a Lot’ From Health Care Debacle

“Donald Trump campaigned to repeal and replace Obamacare in his first 100 days in the White House. He boasted of wielding a businessman’s negotiating skills alongside a determined GOP commitment to upend the old ways of Washington with conservative governance.

But on Friday, his 64th day as president, Trump swallowed his first legislative defeat, after House Republicans balked at passing a health care measure they came to view as flawed and too politically radioactive to embrace before next year’s midterm elections.

“I’m disappointed,” the president told reporters. “I’m a little surprised, to be honest with you. We really had it. It was pretty much there within grasp.”

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — signed by President Obama and a survivor of two Supreme Court decisions and more than five dozen GOP efforts to repeal it — remains the law of the land.

The public-private coverage system created in 2010, which benefits a minority of all Americans but touches all of the health care system, will eventually “explode,” Trump predicted. “It’s going to have a very bad year,” he told reporters in the Oval Office after he and House Speaker Paul Ryan opted to yank the doomed GOP replacement bill from the House floor.

Ryan chalked up his conference’s dramatic flameout to “the growing pains of governing.”

Trump, at least initially, blamed congressional Democrats for standing together against the Republicans’ repeal effort, forcing the GOP to pursue complicated legislative procedural steps that navigated around Democratic opposition, which one frustrated lawmaker compared to trying to shove a camel through a keyhole.

“I think the losers are Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, because now they own Obamacare,” the president said.

(Trump never met with any Democratic lawmakers to seek their ideas before launching the repeal and replace endeavor after January.)

Obamacare, on its own, Trump continued, is teetering in some states in which private insurance policy choices in the federally subsidized marketplaces are evaporating. Premium prices have escalated, and deductibles soared, often rendering policy choices unaffordable for those who can’t access insurance through employers, are not seniors on Medicare, and for the working class whose incomes are too high to qualify for state-based Medicaid.

Asked if he sought to remedy some of those Obamacare problems in the interim (as his predecessor recommended he do during private conversations months ago), the former New York businessman said he was eager to put health care behind him and move to tax reform– another policy-heavy endeavor that in the past has required years, rather than months, of congressional labors.

Failing to enact health care legislation complicates Trump’s tax-cutting ambitions on several levels, White House officials conceded. To underwrite the revenue lost with potential tax cuts, the administration hoped to use savings achieved by repealing the Affordable Care Act.

Trump said he had long predicted that Obamacare would crater, and he boasted he would be proven correct.

“There’s not much you can do to help it,” the president said of the law, which his Department of Health and Human Services is charged with implementing. HHS could make limited alterations under its regulatory authority attached to the Affordable Care Act’s existing provisions, and Trump could work with lawmakers of both parties to craft new piecemeal legislation this year. But he made no specific commitments.

The president sought to save face, arguing he had done everything he could to pass legislation through the House, even if the patched-together product was not entirely to his liking by the end of the week. The demise of the bill presented an opportunity, he argued.

“Both parties can get together and do real health care; that’s the best thing,” the president said. “I think having bipartisan [legislation] would be a big, big improvement,” Trump added. “I think that this is going to end up being a very good thing.”

But in an afternoon phone conversation with the New York Times, the president sounded eager to abandon health care, rather than persist. “It’s enough already,” he said of the negotiations, which the White House noted had included meetings, visits, and telephone calls with more than 120 lawmakers just in the run-up to the anticipated vote this week.

Health care’s policy complexities, which the president never described to his audiences during his recent speeches and rallies, and internecine party politics swamped Trump from the moment he said the White House would have its own repeal and replacement plan. In a hurry, he switched gears early this month and celebrated the Ryan-crafted bill as “the plan,” after the speaker posted it online on a Monday night.

Trump’s labors to overhaul the Affordable Care Act lasted just three weeks. Obama’s efforts, which included both parties before every Republican voted against it, took 18 months.

Health care has been a graveyard for political ambitions for decades. The Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act, later repealed, was a political disaster in 1988 and 1989 that provoked irate elderly constituents to blast President Reagan and chase former House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dan Rostenkowski through an Illinois parking lot while television cameras captured every frame. The Clintons failed to get their secretly constructed universal coverage plan to a vote in 1994, and Hillary Clinton’s opponents used it as a weapon against her in 2008 and 2016.

Mitt Romney pioneered what became a model for Obamacare in Massachusetts as governor, and later turned his back on his own plan as a presidential candidate in 2012. Obama and Democrats initially exulted in 2010 that they would run and win elections on the ACA benefits. Seven years later, the law expanded coverage to an estimated 20 million Americans, reduced the ranks of the uninsured, and “bent the cost curve” of rising health care costs — but it also cost Democrats dearly in four straight election cycles because public opinion remains split.

Trump now has his own health care headstone. The failure Friday challenged everything he celebrated over half a century of brand building: the art of the deal, the dynamics of human behavior, and the ability to achieve a desired outcome on the basis of salesmanship and fears.

Trump said the lessons he drew from such a prominent flop were mixed. He had put two former House members in his Cabinet to navigate the shoals: Tom Price as HHS secretary and Mick Mulvaney as director of the Office of Management and Budget. Trump embraced Ryan’s bill. He instructed Congress that they must link repeal of the ACA to replacement, to occur together. And Trump championed a plan with House Republicans that was supposed to have three phases: the legislation that on Friday died in the House; deregulation accomplished through HHS; and separate health care-related measures that would have required 60 votes in the Senate later on (viewed as a fantasy because Democrats would not collaborate under those terms).

The president also understood that the bill he hoped the House would pass would never clear the Senate, complicating the political stakes for House Republicans who chafed at the more moderate instincts presented by their colleagues in the upper chamber.

While the president met privately with scores of lawmakers, interest groups and stakeholders, he promised Americans a “big, beautiful negotiation,” but offered no details of what Washington was cooking up. It became clear that Trump’s campaign vows that Americans would not lose their coverage, and that an Obamacare replacement would offer higher quality care at lower costs, had changed. During March, the White House softened Trump’s boasts: the new spin became consumer “choice” and “access” to health insurance.

Trump’s job approval poll numbers dipped below 40 percent in several surveys conducted in March, and the president began openly telling the public that he was anxious to move on to tax reform, which he viewed as more fruitful and less politically painful.

It was Ryan who arrived at the White House at midday to tell Trump the House GOP conference did not have 216 votes to pass the measure. Trump later praised the speaker and declined to blame him for the party’s explosive failure. Ryan talked with the president, whose instincts are usually to roll the dice, about whether lawmakers should be compelled to go on the record with their votes Friday afternoon, even if the bill went down. Ryan recommended against that drama, and the president agreed the bill should be pulled from the floor.

“It certainly was an interesting period of time,” Trump said a few hours later. “We all learned a lot. We learned a lot about loyalty. We learned a lot about the vote-getting process. We learned a lot about some very arcane rules in obviously both the Senate and in the House. … Certainly, for me, it’s been a very interesting experience.”

Alexis Simendinger covers the White House for RealClearPolitics. She can be

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2017/03/25/trump_we_learned_a_lot_from_health_care_debacle_133435.html#2

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