• Pragerisms

    For a more comprehensive list of Pragerisms visit
    Dennis Prager Wisdom.

    • "The left is far more interested in gaining power than in creating wealth."
    • "Without wisdom, goodness is worthless."
    • "I prefer clarity to agreement."
    • "First tell the truth, then state your opinion."
    • "Being on the Left means never having to say you're sorry."
    • "If you don't fight evil, you fight gobal warming."
    • "There are things that are so dumb, you have to learn them."
  • Liberalism’s Seven Deadly Sins

    • Sexism
    • Intolerance
    • Xenophobia
    • Racism
    • Islamophobia
    • Bigotry
    • Homophobia

    A liberal need only accuse you of one of the above in order to end all discussion and excuse himself from further elucidation of his position.

  • Glenn’s Reading List for Die-Hard Pragerites

    • Bolton, John - Surrender is not an Option
    • Bruce, Tammy - The Thought Police; The New American Revolution; The Death of Right and Wrong
    • Charen, Mona - DoGooders:How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help
    • Coulter, Ann - If Democrats Had Any Brains, They'd Be Republicans; Slander
    • Dalrymple, Theodore - In Praise of Prejudice; Our Culture, What's Left of It
    • Doyle, William - Inside the Oval Office
    • Elder, Larry - Stupid Black Men: How to Play the Race Card--and Lose
    • Frankl, Victor - Man's Search for Meaning
    • Flynn, Daniel - Intellectual Morons
    • Fund, John - Stealing Elections
    • Friedman, George - America's Secret War
    • Goldberg, Bernard - Bias; Arrogance
    • Goldberg, Jonah - Liberal Fascism
    • Herson, James - Tales from the Left Coast
    • Horowitz, David - Left Illusions; The Professors
    • Klein, Edward - The Truth about Hillary
    • Mnookin, Seth - Hard News: Twenty-one Brutal Months at The New York Times and How They Changed the American Media
    • Morris, Dick - Because He Could; Rewriting History
    • O'Beirne, Kate - Women Who Make the World Worse
    • Olson, Barbara - The Final Days: The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House
    • O'Neill, John - Unfit For Command
    • Piereson, James - Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism
    • Prager, Dennis - Think A Second Time
    • Sharansky, Natan - The Case for Democracy
    • Stein, Ben - Can America Survive? The Rage of the Left, the Truth, and What to Do About It
    • Steyn, Mark - America Alone
    • Stephanopolous, George - All Too Human
    • Thomas, Clarence - My Grandfather's Son
    • Timmerman, Kenneth - Shadow Warriors
    • Williams, Juan - Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It
    • Wright, Lawrence - The Looming Tower

Confessions of a Fortunate Man

The America of 83 years ago in which  I was born, raised, and became an adult in was NOT the crippled  USA we live in today.

I was blessed as were those around me in Church and neighborhood most of  whom I knew.  We all had Mothers then….the ones who stayed at home governing, nursing, disciplining feeding, walking, teasing, playing with their kids.  Most  Fathers worked six days a week and joined in on Church services each Sunday.

We lived together in a very modest but newer section of St. Paul, Minnesota.   Most home lots were 45 feet wide and 90 feet in depth with alleys to the garages in the back of the homes.    All  homes were  bought on time payment.  Purchase price on ours bought in 1936 was $6,200…..’a five room bungalow.

Twice a year all the neighbors living along the block and on both sides, about 20 homes of 28 lots would gather together in May and October when the weather obliged.   All were invited.   The two  Jewish families living across the street from us although always invited….(I was the invitation boy then) never participated, which always made me curious.   Most of the Christians in the neighborhood were Roman Catholic.    Shortly after the end of THE WAR, August, 1945 St. Leo’s Roman Catholic Elementary School was built which put an end to neighborhood gatherings.

Family bonding was very powerful in those days.   Television arrived in the Twin Cities in 1947 or so.   The Lundquists across the street were the first to buy a tv ‘set’…..with a three inch screen plus a magnifying glass to enlarge the view.

Dad bought our  first set in 1948, an 11 inch Philco floor set.

Females had beautiful voices then.  None of them sounded like forever teenies with nasal problems and piercing whines.  While radio and films dominated the language,   Joan Crawford and Bette Davis speech were the standard of the day…..elegant!

All of the married women and men living on our block, those attending Church, teachers in school, folks buying things at dime stores or the corner food markets, or at my dad’s drug store, spoke and acted very adult……with NO SWEARING and no sloppy dressing, no teeny-boppers when ‘going public’….such as shopping, Church, voting, visiting,  walking, attending school where jeans were not allowed or even while getting a haircut at  the barber shop.

Divorce hadn’t arrived yet.   Only those in Hollywood were wealthy enough to play around with it.

And  the nation went to war when I was in the second grade.

My Father’s dad was born in 1857 before the Civil War began.  He was the fourth boy of a wealthy Cherryfield, Maine family which practiced primogeniture, an old English practice where the  oldest boy would typically inherit the  family estate and wealth.

Somewhere in my house I have this grandfather’s postcard from Chillicothe, Ohio, dated 1874, sent home to his Mother in Maine with his photograph leading the message……”Mother, I’m fine….Frank”.

Guess where he was going?  ….(on horseback, by the way)?    To some place in North Dakota called “Hope”….My grandfather was homesteading and was going West to fulfill his claim.  About 15 years later my grandmother’s entire family left their ‘nest’ in southern Wisconsin to settle west of the Sheyenne River in North Dakota.   Their entourage of six or seven horse- drawn carriages loaded with what the family could ‘carry’,  got stuck in the river mud.   Grandfather, i.e. Frank Ray, who died of throat cancer 17 years before I was born, came to the rescue.

The Wisconsin crew which included Anna Williams,  settled about 15 miles from the Ray farm near Hope township…..Frank and Anna, my dad’s parents were married about ten years later.

 

 

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