• Pragerisms

    For a more comprehensive list of Pragerisms visit
    Dennis Prager Wisdom.

    • "The left is far more interested in gaining power than in creating wealth."
    • "Without wisdom, goodness is worthless."
    • "I prefer clarity to agreement."
    • "First tell the truth, then state your opinion."
    • "Being on the Left means never having to say you're sorry."
    • "If you don't fight evil, you fight gobal warming."
    • "There are things that are so dumb, you have to learn them."
  • Liberalism’s Seven Deadly Sins

    • Sexism
    • Intolerance
    • Xenophobia
    • Racism
    • Islamophobia
    • Bigotry
    • Homophobia

    A liberal need only accuse you of one of the above in order to end all discussion and excuse himself from further elucidation of his position.

  • Glenn’s Reading List for Die-Hard Pragerites

    • Bolton, John - Surrender is not an Option
    • Bruce, Tammy - The Thought Police; The New American Revolution; The Death of Right and Wrong
    • Charen, Mona - DoGooders:How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help
    • Coulter, Ann - If Democrats Had Any Brains, They'd Be Republicans; Slander
    • Dalrymple, Theodore - In Praise of Prejudice; Our Culture, What's Left of It
    • Doyle, William - Inside the Oval Office
    • Elder, Larry - Stupid Black Men: How to Play the Race Card--and Lose
    • Frankl, Victor - Man's Search for Meaning
    • Flynn, Daniel - Intellectual Morons
    • Fund, John - Stealing Elections
    • Friedman, George - America's Secret War
    • Goldberg, Bernard - Bias; Arrogance
    • Goldberg, Jonah - Liberal Fascism
    • Herson, James - Tales from the Left Coast
    • Horowitz, David - Left Illusions; The Professors
    • Klein, Edward - The Truth about Hillary
    • Mnookin, Seth - Hard News: Twenty-one Brutal Months at The New York Times and How They Changed the American Media
    • Morris, Dick - Because He Could; Rewriting History
    • O'Beirne, Kate - Women Who Make the World Worse
    • Olson, Barbara - The Final Days: The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House
    • O'Neill, John - Unfit For Command
    • Piereson, James - Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism
    • Prager, Dennis - Think A Second Time
    • Sharansky, Natan - The Case for Democracy
    • Stein, Ben - Can America Survive? The Rage of the Left, the Truth, and What to Do About It
    • Steyn, Mark - America Alone
    • Stephanopolous, George - All Too Human
    • Thomas, Clarence - My Grandfather's Son
    • Timmerman, Kenneth - Shadow Warriors
    • Williams, Juan - Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It
    • Wright, Lawrence - The Looming Tower

I: The Disappearing American Human Female…..Looking Back to THE WAR!

I was born in 1934.   I was born to be very, very visual, gifted with  a great memory, but crippled when it came to reading novels.    This meant I was very accomplished in some worlds of learning, but school life could be very bleak when it came to reading novels and taking standard tests.   It turned out I had, what was called in those days, a photographic memory.

At age 84, I can still see and remember the names of my classroom teachers until I entered college.

I had no clue I was in scholastic trouble until college.   The only course I ever failed was Geomorphology, a requirement needed to secure  my first ‘major’ study, Geography.   Outside of Climatology, of the 40 quarter credits required to major in the field, I earned straight A in each course at a time when undergraduates were weeded out of the “Social-Liberal Arts ” school 40% per year.

I was poorly disciplined yet in those days.  I wasn’t certain I knew what school discipline meant.  I did the best I could as I was told.    I was born  exceedingly gifted and  crippled by curiosity.   Nearly all of my pre-college public school teachers were old maids, gifted with knowledge and experience teaching in their fields, in a male adult environment where no student  was allowed to misbehave…..(except occasionally  when substitute teachers would show up.)

I couldn’t run then.   I was seriously crippled by asthma until college.  Later in life, I discovered my life with  dyslexia….well after it had been “invented”, however.   I own well over 1,000 books and have snooped through them all….especially readers of the American nineteenth century.   The only book I have ever read cover to cover…..and have repeated doing so, is George Orwell’s “1984”.

I was well raised JudeoChristian and am “God-fearing” to this day….although unchurched.   The most moving religious ceremonies I have ever experienced were Russian Orthodox….especially that 1990 October Sunday in Kiev when the Soviet Red authorities there opened services at  St. Nicholas “Cathedral” that day when  I became one of thousands upon thousands of locals  who joined the inspiring  hours of ceremony  that  morning.

In all,  curiosity sent me collecting around 700 quarter credits of college  in my life time….yet, only one graduate degree….. “Soviet Studies” where all classes were given and to be spoken only  in Russian.   (Bwillo chudno!!)   The study allowed me transport and time to  speak Russian in  the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, almost as if I lived there,  on two occasions, in August, 1966 and in October, 1990.

They needed the American dollar!

I was born, raised, and still live in Minnesota’s Twin Cities.   Almost a year of my life was spent in Europe, mostly in Great Britain,  throughout the 1990s absorbing the arts of  landscape gardening.

It was about a half century ago when civilized America slipped into the drug world of sex, crime, ignorance, feminism,  and leftism…..about 1968 in our Twin Cities…… when learnings, jobs, American Christianity, Truth seeking, family life, and womanhood  were all still allowed, practiced, and honored….and the door to racial freedom was to be, at last,  opened!

I taught Russian at the University of Minnesota High School from 1960 to 1967…..and Social Studies and Russian at a working class Minneapolis High School until Spring, 1971.  I had been in the US Army 1957 and 1958.  (I was a child of WWII who religiously and closely followed the war and its pictures and maps from the Battle of Midway  that June of 1942 to the very end, August 15, 1945!  I wanted to know  what I would do if shot at!….as my cousins were!   Our neighborhoods everywhere were still safe in 1956.

I had earned my first Bachelor’s degree that year….and wasn’t sure what to do with it.

I had Winston Churchill’s quote always on my mind from the war…….”The most exhilarating moment in life is to be shot at……………and have been missed”.   Prime Minister Churchill was speaking from experience.

Women were still women then, that August well up to 1960….Christian, mothers, God-fearing, neighborhood ruling, family tending,  raising children, keeping  the home front together during the war.  Neighbors Mr. and Mrs. Landmark had lost their son early in the war in the Pacific.  My dad was in his 40s then, and we lived in St. Paul.  He joined the Air Raid force in our part of the city and was on active duty from Spring 1942 until the following winter.    Twice a week he and his force would walk up and down his team’s blocks to make sure every light in every house was out until siren count at about 9:30 or so.

Our family, actually mostly I, as it turned out, wound up starting  in May of 1942,  in charge of planting and maintaining our neighborhood’s VICTORY GARDEN.   The city would plow up the soil of the empty lots across the alley from us for free if we would agree to plant and care for  vegetables there for the war effort.  We could keep half of the crop for our own family use, but share the remaining half with our neighbors.

That is where I learned my love for plant life……a drug that has stayed with me to this very wintery winter day.

During that first year of the war, our neighborhood folk crowded together  at our local grade school gymnasium twice each month on Monday’s at 7PM to sing patriotic songs for a couple of hours and sign up for war duties such as mothers being taught how to bandage their children if the enemy ever reached ‘our shores’.   I enjoyed the stardom I received when my Mother shared me with other mothers  bandaged up…..

Every house on our block and the block east of ours, had Mothers and children  but one, where grand parents lived whose daughter brought her two boys to the neighborhood from Cedar Rapids, Iowa each summer season for years.

Every Spring and Fall until after the War was over,  our neighborhood would picnic in the lot where we raised our vegetables from egg plant to sweet corn, tomatoes to okra, green beans,  squash, onions,  sprouts, lettuce, rutabaga, white potatoes, and more….the world I   at age 8 to 11 was the primary seeder, weeder, harvester, and insect killer.

I loved it all.   I played war games while pinching potato beetles by dive bombing them as if they were Stukas or Zeros off of the potato leaves and sticking them into a can of  car grease.

Even in our safe Minnesota urban neighborhood women were working overtime in some way to aid our nation’s war effort.   But, they were MOTHERS FIRST AND FOREMOST!   They raised their children to be God fearing, to behave, be polite,  caring for others…..or else!    I never heard a curse word of any kind until I heard the word damn used when I was a freshman at St. Paul’s Central High School the spring of 1949.  A new kid to the school that Spring, Dave Martin, uttered it while we 9th graders were quietly going outside for recess one day.   He was made to disappear from school for one week for his error.

There was no television in our Twin Cities until 1947.   Our first set was an 11 inch black and white screened Philco.   Colored television wasn’t yet on the market for several years yet.  Neighbors were still neighbors then…  moms were moms talking to each other, helping each other, sharing with each other,  laughing with each other.   Moms stayed at home and were real moms, teaching, preaching, playing, gardening,  sewing, decorating, respected.   I didn’t know “crime” in action until a junior in high school when two boys in my school were caught shooting bbs at autos one evening along Snelling Avenue and St. Claire.  They were sent to detention for a couple of months.

My Mother did work part time at my dad’s drug store from 1947 to the mid 1950s.   Mrs. Merrill across the street was a working nurse half time  throughout and after the war.  No other Mother on the block worked even when I entered the army in January, 1957.

Butches hadn’t been invented yet, certainly not in the public arena.   No one on the block had been divorced, either.   No one had a reputation of being ugly or beating up anyone.  Only Tommy Joyce’s dad was known to “drink” from time to time.   However, “Spiral Staircase”  was a big hit at our neighborhood movie house in 1947 or 1948.  I sneaked out to see it one 7PM  just before rain fell and thunder clapped arrogantly  anxious to see what adults were complaining about.   I learned far more than I wanted to learn about what some adult guys might be up to…..and added my sweat to the rain and thunder as I ran home to sweet home.

 

 

 

A Personal View regarding Some Advantages of being Dyslexic!

The Advantages of Dyslexia

With reading difficulties can come other cognitive strengths

Note:  I am 84 years old.  Today, November 14, 2018 is the first time I have researched even a page of knowledge about the details of dyslexia.  It was invented, discovered about 50 years ago, but I wasn’t much of a reader so I didn’t bother to delve any  further to a field I was not involved in.

Until two years ago when I had a right knee replacement, I possessed a memory unique whether important to remember or not.  I am now slowly recovering from some of the memory loss a month of oxycodone 7 times a day caused.

My Mother was German and Germanic.  She wanted me out of her sight when at work inside our house.  Every weekday every morning around ten,  she’d listen to classical music on radio  from Chicago.  It was still depression time, pre World War II, 1938.  Think lots of static.  Every day, every morning, afternoon, and even at night I asked her endless numbers of questions…why she was doing what, where, and how those things she was  doing!   When I was four, she had had it!  That is when the punishments began….the same punishment, the same hour each day, Monday through Friday.  It followed, “If you ask me one more question, you’re going to the wall….Do you understand that…..GLENN RAY!

I understood, but I kept forgetting.  I was driven.  So, at age 4 I began my trip to soft stucco wall at the front door entryway to our living room as a punishment chamber…..60 minutes each foray; her being Germanic it was sixty minutes, not 59 or 61.

I gave her a pouted face once, only once. I was a quick learner.  I thought I could make her feel sad, even mean making me suffer by standing at that wall.   Four years old didn’t matter, however.  The pout cost me  2 hours of standing at the wall.  Pouting was never going to be my line again.

The American part of World War II broke out the December when I was four.  I had already discovered state road maps…..and could draw the map of Minnesota and Wisconsin quite accurately.   Mother bought me a Rand McNally World Atlas book of maps  that Christmas of 1941 when I was seven.

I was hooked by maps thereafter, and she knew it….She bought me  a globe of the world the next Christmas so I could follow the war more closely and spend less time at her windows.

Belle Swanson, forty going on ninety years old, was my second grade teacher.   Somewhere around mid January  that year she announced me to her class for the first time….by informing my fellow classmates, “Children…Glenn Ray has finally decided to make his “G”s and “R”s properly.  Isn’t that nice of him? …in sarcasm even I could recognize that very moment.   She approached my desk to show me her proof by comparing my yesterday’s backward G and R and today’s correct capital G and R.

I was stunned with what I saw.   She had many times carped and carped about me being obstinate by not making my capital Gs an Rs properly.   “Boys can sure make trouble”, she’d groan.  I was her proof, but without intending to do so. .

My mom did permit me to copy war zone maps from the atlas she bought me.  I’d  press the maps under the paper against the window  so I could draw islands around the South Pacific and pretend I was fighting the enemy along side my two step-uncles, age 17 and 19,  who were on ships in the Pacific fighting the enemy.

My coup  in school occurred in the third grade.   Mrs. Lucille Jaeger became  my favorite teacher of all time.   I was very shy in class.  I couldn’t read anything in paragraphs. Teachers would make their students  stand and read a paragraph or two or three  out loud to the class, so I was made embarrassed over and over again when I stood up….what could I say?

I could read newspaper headlines and rotogravure picture readings beginning with the Battle of Midway, June, 1942.   Headlines, cutlines, and pictures together taught me their stories visually, collectively making me see and so, read photographically  by  memory to this day.

Mrs. Jaeger presented me with a coup in my life.   It was winter but well after Christmas, that I remember.   “Glenn Ray” she called in class.   (We had to stand up at attention when called.)  I was never afraid of her, only shocked because I was called at all!

“I understand you draw maps” she stated.  “Is that right?”

I concurred.   “Could you draw a map of the United States on the blackboard for the class to see?”   (“Do I have two feet”, I thought…but politely and shyly answered I could….for I had played drawing maps many times at home, by heart, just for fun or something to learn or simply pass the time playing games I have invented.)

I’d start at Inlet, Minnesota, that bump on top of our state’s head and draw westward to Puget Sound, draw the Sound a bit and then go South along the Pacific to San Francisco and its bay, down south to the  Mexican border to the straight lines to border Arizona to Texas and the Rio Grande, to the Mississippi Delta and a few ‘bump’s to the peninsula of Florida up the Atlantic to Chesapeake Bay and such around Northern Virginia.  It was fun drawing the Massachusetts part  into the Ocean, then to the head I called Maine and then turned West again to the Great Lakes and home, Minnesota.  It took about three minutes.

Both Mrs. Jaeger and students were shocked….but the best was yet to happen.  As my teacher was about to thank me, I asked her if she wanted me to map in the states as well?

We didn’t have the time, she said.   At the time I had no clue that I had earned a unique status in serving my third grade classes thereafter.   I was very good at drawing landscape settings.   All these pieces of art I could do were caused by my Mother to keep me from asking her questions……SUCH IS LIFE!

I have never read a novel  cover to cover beyond “1984”, which in my view isn’t a novel at all.  It is a book of leftwing horror that every human being should read and know as a political bible contrary to the Bible of our JudeoChristian believers…..the ones Leftist Fascists are replacing in today’s American culture.

…..

Now, what is DYSLEXIA according to the Scientific American below?

“Dyslexia is often called a “learning disability.” And it can indeed present learning challenges. Although its effects vary widely, children with dyslexia read so slowly that it would typically take them a half a year to read the same number of words other children might read in a day. Therefore, the fact that people who read so slowly were so adept at picking out the impossible figures was a big surprise to the researchers. After all, why would people who are slow in reading be fast at responding to visual representations of causal reasoning?

Though the psychologists may have been surprised, many of the people with dyslexia I speak with are not. In our laboratory at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics we have carried out studies funded by the National Science Foundation to investigate talents for scienceamong those with dyslexia. The dyslexic scientist Christopher Tonkin described to me his sense of this as a sensitivity to “things out of place.”  He’s easily bothered by the weeds among the flowers in his garden, and he felt that this sensitivity for visual anomalies was something he built on in his career as a professional scientist.  Such differences in sensitivity for causal perception may explain why people like Carole Greider and Baruj Benacerraf have been able to perform Nobel prize-winning science despite lifelong challenges with dyslexia.

In one study, we tested professional astrophysicists with and without dyslexia for their abilities to spot the simulated graphical signature in a spectrum characteristic of a black hole. The scientists with dyslexia —perhaps sensitive to the weeds among the flowers— were better at picking out the black holes from the noise, an advantage useful in their careers. Another study in our laboratory compared the abilities of college students with and without dyslexia for memorizing blurry-looking images resembling x-rays. Again, those with dyslexia showed an advantage, an advantage in that can be useful in science or medicine.

Why are there advantages in dyslexia?  Is it something about the brains of people with dyslexia that predisposes them to causal thinking? Or, is it a form of compensation, differences in the brain that occur because people with dyslexia read less? Unfortunately, the answer to these questions is unknown.

One thing we do know for sure is that reading changes the structure of the brain. An avid reader might read for an hour or more a day, day in and day out for years on end. This highly specialized repetitive training, requiring an unnaturally precise, split-second control over eye movements, can quickly restructure the visual system so as to make some pathways more efficient than the others.

When illiterate adults were taught to read, an imaging study led by Stanislas Dehaene in France showed that changes occurred in the brain as reading was acquired. But, as these adults developed skills for reading, they also lost their former abilities to process certain types of visual information, such as the ability to determine when an object is the mirrorimage of another.  Learning to read therefore comes at a cost, and the ability to carry out certain types of visual processing are lost when people learn to read. This would suggest that the visual strengths in dyslexia are simply an artifact of differences in reading experience, a trade-off that occurs as a consequence of poor reading in dyslexia.

My colleagues and I suggested that one reason people with dyslexia may exhibit visual talents is that they have difficulty managing visual attention. It may at first seem ironic that a difficulty can lead to an advantage, but it makes sense when you realize that what we call “advantages” and “disadvantages” have meaning only in the context of the task that needs to be performed.

For example, imagine you’re looking to hire a talented security guard. This person’s job will be to spot things that look odd and out of place, and call the police when something suspicious —say, an unexpected footprint in a flowerbed— is spotted. If this is the person’s task, would you rather hire a person who is an excellent reader, who has the ability to focus deeply and get lost in the text, or would you rather hire a person who is sensitive to changes in their visual environment, who is less apt to focus and block out the world?

Tasks such as reading require an ability to focus your attention on the words as your eyes scan a sentence, to quickly and accurately shift your attention in sequence from one word to the next.  But, to be a good security guard you need an opposite skill; you need to be able to be alert to everything all at once, and though this isn’t helpful for reading, this can lead to talents in other areas. If the task is to find the logical flaw in an impossible figure, then this can be done more quickly if you can distribute your attention everywhere on the figure all at once. If you tend to focus on the visual detail, to examine every piece of the figure in sequence, it could take you longer to determine whether these parts add up to the whole, and you would be at a disadvantage.

These studies raise the possibility that visual attention deficits, present from a very early age, are responsible for the reading challenges that are characteristic of dyslexia. If this theory is upheld, it would also suggest that the observed advantages are not an incidental byproduct of experience with reading, but are instead the result of differences in the brain that were likely present from birth.

If this is indeed the case, given that attention affects perception in very general ways, any number of advantages should emerge.  While people with dyslexia may tend to miss details in their environment that require an attentional focus, they would be expected to be better at noticing things that are distributed more broadly.  To put this another way, while typical readers may tend to miss the forest because it’s view is blocked by all the trees, people with dyslexia may see things more holistically, and miss the trees, but see the forest.

Among other advantages observed, Gadi Geiger and his colleagues at MIT found that people with dyslexia can distribute their attention far more broadly than do typical readers, successfully identifying letters flashed simultaneously in the center and the periphery for spacings that were much further apart. They also showed that such advantages are not just for things that are visual, but that they apply to sounds as well. In one study, simulating the sounds of a cocktail party, they found that people with dyslexia were able to pick out more words spoken by voices widely-distributed in the room, compared with people who were proficient readers.

Whether or not observations of such advantages —measured in the laboratory— have applications to talents in real life remains an open question. But, whatever the reason, a clear trend is beginning to emerge: People with dyslexia may exhibit strengths for seeing the big picture (both literally and figuratively) others tend to miss.  Thomas G. West has long argued that out-of-the-box thinking is historically part and parcel of dyslexia, and more recently physicians Brock and Fernette Eide have advanced similar arguments. Sociologists, such as Julie Logan of the Cass Business School in London agree.  Logan found that dyslexia is relatively common among business entrepreneurs; people who tend to think differently and see the big picture in thinking creatively about a business.

Whatever the mechanism, one thing is clear: dyslexia is associated with differences in visual abilities, and these differences can be an advantage in many circumstances, such as those that occur in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In physics we know that an engine is capable of productive work only when there are differences in temperature, hot versus cold. It’s only when everything is all the same that nothing productive can get done. Neurological differences similarly drive the engine of society, to create the contrasts between hot and cold that lead to productive work. Impairments in one area can lead to advantages in others, and it is these differences that drive progress in many fields, including science and math. After all, there are probably many more than three kinds of mathematicians, and society needs them all.”

Remembering the Soviet Past

From Russian Bolsheviks to American Socialists

by Alexander G. Markovsky  at American Thinker:

In December 1991, the world watched in amazement and trepidation as the communist empire spectacularly collapsed. The jubilation proved to be premature. Marxism adapted to a new reality and, in one of the most dramatic reversals of history, comfortably relocated to the United States, where it acquired a new life and malignancy within the Democratic Party.

In 2008 this ferment culminated in the election of Barack Obama who by 2016 had successfully transformed the Democratic Party into the de facto Social Democratic Party.

For those who are not familiar with the terminology:

Social democracy is a political ideology that has as its goal the establishment of socialism through implementation of a policy regime that includes, but is not limited to, high taxation, government regulation of private enterprises, and establishment of a universal welfare state.

Had Obama been succeeded by Hillary Clinton, America would have continued the smooth transition into socialism as planned. But as it often happens with the best-laid plans, life arranged some unexpected detours. What was near-universally seen as foreordained was preempted by the election of Donald Trump.

The collapse of high expectations did not shatter the socialists’ capacity to shape posterity. As the aspirations of the Bolshevik Revolution were being reincarnated in Vermont and exported to New York and California, the country inured to the world of unsustainable populist demands.  The barrier separating utopia and reason is crumbling; growing embrace of free education, free health care, and a guaranteed minimum income by young people is an obvious indication of the rise of the socialist movement.

Yet, despite socialism’s increasing appeal, the Democrats are aware that “socialism” is still a dirty word in the political vocabulary and the population at large. Indeed, using the term socialism would be too forward leaning. So, they mask Marxist ideology by not mentioning the word “socialism” without the prefix “democratic.”

The “democratic” cannot conceal a commonality of the ideological vocabulary of the Democratic Party’s leadership with Marxism. Visceral hatred of capitalism and seductive promises of miraculous fulfilment of egalitarian dreams leave little doubt about the Party becoming a plagiarizing scum of Lenin’s faction of the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party (RSDLP) or Bolsheviks. Coincidentally they also had “democratic” in the party name.

Therefore, we shall not be confused by the ideological taxonomy. Democratic socialism promulgated by Bernie Sanders and his disciples is a socialist trojan horse disguised as an alternative to Marxism. Unlike the Bolshevik’s strategy of taking power via violent revolution, this one emulates the strategy of the Russian Mensheviks Julius Martov and Pavel Axelrod designed to enact socialism gradually and make it more palatable by installing the Hugo Chavezes of this world through the democratic process.

This slow-roll strategy designed to do to the United States incrementally what Russian Bolshevism did to Russia in 1917 abruptly. The Democratic Party’s socialism is nothing less than its Marxist inheritance implemented by other means. Notwithstanding its heavy Russian accent, Democratic socialism is bringing under one roof all the true believers and intellectuals disheartened and disillusioned by the ugliness of Stalinism, Maoism, and other socialist “isms” but still yearning for equality, fairness, and righteousness. It is also intended to ascertain ideological cohesion among pseudo-patriot advocates of strong governmental authority and left-wing lunatics, to whom capitalism is a common enemy.

Regardless of how the socialists come to power and what variants between political flavors of Christian democratic socialism, Soviet-style revolutionary socialism, social democratic socialism or any other kind of socialism are, they all trace their origins to Karl Marx’s “scientific socialism” and share the common mantra — “fair and equitable” distribution of wealth. Hence, the differences are superficial. The ultimate goal of socialism is economic equality.

If the uneducated graduates of American universities and supporters of socialism absorb human history, they may realize that the only historical datum that points to economic equality goes back to the era of primitive communism. There were no property and no wealth, resulting in total economic equality — in poverty. Ironically, this is the only way economic equality can be achieved; there is no equality in wealth. The critics of socialism who point out that socialism fails to create wealth are missing the point. Socialism is not about wealth creation, it is about wealth distribution. In this context, socialism works, it works as it supposed to. Venezuela, Cuba, North Korea, etc. are not socialism’s failures; they are actually a fulfillment.

Nevertheless, we have to be mindful that every ism — communism, socialism, fascism, etc. — has its supporters and benefactors. Those who imagine themselves on the receiving end, have every reason to think they will be better off with socialism. But those, whose naiveté never melts away, must understand that socialism is the philosophy of poverty.

Thanks to the fatuity of the American public, there has not been any effective comprehension of the totality of the assault nor its enervating effect upon national vigilance.  We may surmise that the socialist dragon has come of age and poses the existential threat to our way of life.

 
https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2018/10/from_russian_bolsheviks_to_american_socialists_.html

(Note from Glenn.   I once learned to speak Russian quite fluently.   My Master Degree in Soviet Studies was taught in Russian by upper class Russian emigres.    As it turned out, I learned the czar’s elegant Russian in tone and pronunciation but I had no clue to this reality until my first visit to the USSR in 1966.   I had received a National Defense Education Act grant to buoy up the flagging Soviet economy of the day according to the Russian needs, and to become more acquainted with Soviet style and culture of the day according to Uncle Sam’s needs.

The Union of the Soviet Socialist “Republic” was still a first rate Stalinist fascist state at that time.  The unwanteds…almost all  males  were sent to labor and die in Siberia.  Females usually behaved  within their  police state, obeying the Communist world of spydom and thought control and so, avoided the Siberian brutal cold and death.

I visited Leningrad, Moscow, Rostov, and Sochi…..traveling mostly by train.

My Tsarist teachers of Russian were proud of my Russian enunciation.  I simply obeyed exactly pronouncing  that which they told me to say.   When in Sochi toward the end of my Soviet time, about an hour after arriving to our ‘cottage’ near the sands of the Black Sea, I raced out to the beach to explore and mix with the Soviet souls around me.  It was not a comfortable seaside, but the locals didn’t seem to care.

I came across a Chevrolet-like vehicle positioned strangely on the coarse sand with unSoviet type license plates.  About fifteen guys of all ages were examining the car as if it were from Mars.  Some were standing on the bumpers as to test their mechanical virility.  Others were pounding  on the fenders by hand or foot apparently for the same test.  But the chatter centered on what country the sedan had come from!  It’s German….no, French.   Sweden came in third….there’d be debate about something mechanical (using words I didn’t learn) ….until Britain entered the scene.

I joined the chorus.  Why do you think this might be a British automobile?  A twentyish he gave several answers and followed curiously asking what country I thought it came from.

I did know make of cars fairly well back then.   It was an American make, but made in Britain for Brits not Yanks….and so, told him so.     My answer apparently was received  as if by state authority, but I hadn’t meant it that way.   A pause followed….and then more pause….He walked to the other side of the Chevrolet make,  talked to some guys on that side,  and then returned slightly authoritatively asked why I thought it  was a British automobile.

I answered, “I’m an American.   This car is an automobile made in Britain very similar to the one we make in Detroit, in America.”

All of the guys had been listening.  They were stunned.  I was quite experienced with this approach.   I had used a similar approach   at a beach riverside in Kiev on two occasions when young couples were playing card games on the sand.

I’d ask a question.  They would balk at my rudeness.   I’d continue with a question…about weather, what game was being played, were they from Kiev,  as introductions.

They get more peeved the more I asked.  It was considered rude, but it never turned out that way.  I’d eventually apologize and then follow up with “I am a foreigner here…I didn’t mean to bother”.   Then I’d turn from the stun of their silence slowly taking a small step or two away and I’d hear…..”Excuse me…Where are you from?”

I knew I had ’em.  “Ya inostranyetz …..eez Amyeriki” I’d reply on these occasions.   At the first Kiev beach scene,  well over one hundred Soviet beach folks   gathered in no time for once  the two Russian couples  stood up to persuade me to stay  and talk we remained standing.

Standing in crowds talking in groups whether on beach or city  in summer 1966 Soviet Union was NOT condoned by the police whether  the secret kind or not.   Yet this time it took the local Soviets more than an hour to send in their uniformed  police, guns and all, eight in number, sweating as if they had been swimming.

They were also unhappy.   I had been answering question after question from the swelling group.   I loved that question so often asked in the good part of the then USSR….”Where did you learn such beautiful Russian?”   I couldn’t tell them from offspring of tough  Tsarist class Whites who had escaped Manchuria in the 1950s.

“He’s from America.   Don’t embarrass us!” one male shouted loudly at a cop nearest to me.  The group of one hundred and more quickly dispersed.   I had been away from my blanket and very expensive Swiss camera and  1,000 rubles in a small leather bag left lying on it so lonely.    Nothing had been stolen!

A similar scene occurred at the Sochi beach where that made-in-Britain  car sat studied by Soviets I mentioned earlier.   The armed police arrived in about an hour and rather rudely dispersed all very authoritatively and so quite  quickly.

Yet, two couples in their thirties approached me to go with them to a nearby beach bar setting…a rather winsome place, as it turned out.   None of the four were Russian.   I believe they were Georgian and had a bit of an accent, but not of Stalinist blood.

Our chatter was like I was with folks from home.  And then suddenly talk stopped.  One of the gals asked me to talk…..keep on talking…talk about anything……”I’ve never heard Russian spoken so beautifully!”

“My teachers wee Russian”, was my answer.  “They were very demanding that I should speak as they spoke!”

Speaking tsarist Russian had disappeared decades ago in the USSR….mostly by Soviet slaughter.

(I’ll edit this another day.  ghr)

 

 

 

 

 

MN Man, John Hinderaker, Visits the Minnesota State Fair

AN ENCOURAGING AFTERNOON AT THE FAIR

Today, I spent the afternoon at the Minnesota State Fair. I was on the radio for 2 1/2 hours with my friends Ed Morrissey and Lee Michaels of AM 1280 the Patriot. Minnesota’s State Fair is one of the world’s great events. Even the New York Times, which is rarely right about anything, has acknowledged as much.

If you have never been to the Minnesota State Fair, photos accompany the Times story. Like this, for example:

Which gives you some idea. Today I was probably the only Fairgoer dressed in a coat and tie and carrying a briefcase. What can I say? I was coming from my office and was on company time.

All Minnesota politicians work the Fair. (It was at the Fair that Al Franken encountered one or more of his #MeToo women.) It is a unique opportunity to talk with a broad cross-section of Minnesotans–Americans, that is–and learn what is on their minds. Today at the Patriot booth, we interviewed my Congressman, Jason Lewis, who is running for re-election in a bellwether swing district; Doug Wardlow, the Republican who is running against Keith Ellison for Attorney General; and Karin Housley, the Senate candidate who I think may score a major win for the GOP.

These candidates’ comments on their State Fair experiences were strikingly similar. They all noted the yawning chasm between the “news” as reported on cable TV stations and in the liberal media, and the concerns expressed by State Fairgoers. No one cares about Paul Manafort. No one cares about Amaroso, or whatever her name is. Everyone knows taxes have been cut, and everyone knows the economy has taken off. There is massive support for continuing the policies of the Trump administration. Impeachment? No one is talking about it, but the last thing voters want is to derail the successes of the last year and a half.

In my opinion, Minnesota State Fairgoers are as good a cross-section of American voters as you can find. And, despite the old-time roots music at the Farmers Union booth–the Farmers Union still exists, apparently–and a pretty darn good 60s band at the AFL-CIO booth, it doesn’t appear that many Minnesotans are buying what the far Left is selling. That is probably a pretty good microcosm of American voters.

I am very much tuned into this, since I have been invited to testify before the Joint Economic Committee of Congress next Thursday, a week from tomorrow, on the effects of the Trump tax cuts on Minnesota’s economy. Those effects have been positive, to say the least. I think voters across America, not just in Minnesota, have noticed. I will have more to say about my Joint Economic Committee appearance in due course.

To wrap up, here is a photo of me with Karin Housley following our interview. I told her I would only post it on my family’s chat line. Sorry, Karin, I changed my mind:

Karin Housley is one of the nicest and most hard-working people I have met in politics, and she is a solid conservative. You can help her by going here to donate. She represents a real opportunity for a Senate pickup. Trust me on this one.

Similarly, my friend Jason Lewis is in a tight re-election race in Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District. He won in 2016 by 1.7%, and the Democrats are running the same candidate, lesbian activist Angie Craig, this time. If Republicans carry districts like Minnesota’s 2nd, we will hold the House. If not, we won’t. Jason is a long-time talk radio host and both a principled and a practical conservative–the sort of person we need more of in Washington. You can contribute to his campaign here. Again, I vouch for Jason as a worthy conservative candidate who won’t go swamp on us, and whose seat is vital to maintaining control of the House.

Finally, if you don’t want a Nation of Islam has-been; an abolish-ICE, sanctuary state, no-borders leftist; a multiple domestic abuser; and a life-long advocate for cop-killers elected Attorney General of Minnesota, where his entire agenda will be bedeviling the Trump administration, not enforcing the laws–many of which he is opposed to and has pledged to disregard–go here to contribute to Doug Wardlow’s campaign. Doug is a good guy and the alternative to a truly dark future for Minnesota law enforcement.

When I watch cable news, I get depressed. When I spend an afternoon at the State Fair, I think there is still hope. Let’s make it happen!

 

https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2018/08/an-encouraging-afternoon-at-the-fair.ph

(Proof not all is gray, fascistic, sulky and Ellison in Minnesota……at least for a day!)

GOPers Join Donkeys Complaining about Our Donald’s Wonderful Use of Tweeting to U.S. Folks!

ANOTHER STRANGE CHAPTER IN THE TRUMP/SESSIONS SAGA

President Trump continued publicly to criticize Jeff Sessions, his Attorney General, yesterday. He tweeted:

“Department of Justice will not be improperly influenced by political considerations.” Jeff, this is GREAT, what everyone wants, so look into all of the corruption on the “other side” including deleted Emails, Comey lies & leaks, Mueller conflicts, McCabe, Strzok, Page, Ohr.

FISA abuse, Christopher Steele & his phony and corrupt Dossier, the Clinton Foundation, illegal surveillance of Trump Campaign, Russian collusion by Dems – and so much more. Open up the papers & documents without redaction? Come on Jeff, you can do it, the country is waiting!

Many have become numb to the weirdness of a president who publicly taunts not just his adversaries, but his own appointees. I’ll return to that subject in a moment, but first, let’s look at the substance of the taunt.

It’s not the job of the Justice Department to pursue every talking point pushed by members of his party. In this case, though, Trump is right that serious issues of corruption have been raised.

But the Justice Department is “looking into” most of them. It has investigated the conduct of McCabe and Strzok. Both have been fired. It has referred McCabe’s case for possible criminal indictment.

Moreover, the Justice Department reportedly is investigating the Clinton Foundation over allegations of pay-to-play. And Sessions has appointed U.S. Attorney John Huber to investigate the FBI’s behavior during the 2016 campaign.

Huber has broad prosecutor’s power. He can convene a grand jury, issue subpoenas, collect evidence and order witnesses as he delves into such matters as whether the FBI abused its powers when it sought permission and then carried out wiretapping of a Trump campaign figure, or whether it trod too lightly in pursuing questions about Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

We haven’t heard much about Huber’s work, but that’s not surprising. He hasn’t been on the job for nearly as long as Mueller has been. In addition, Huber has no incentive to publicize his work, and neither does the mainstream media.

Even in the face of inaction, it would be odd for a president publicly to exhort his AG to investigate these matters. Given that many of them are under investigation, Trump’s exhortation is downright weird.

Sessions works for Trump. If Trump has questions about what is or is not being investigated at the DOJ, all he has to do is ask Sessions. If he wants to urge that something be investigated all he has to do tell him.

Sessions was at the White House on Thursday. He could have exhorted Sessions in private. Had he done so, Sessions might have reminded the president that most of the matters he later tweeted about are being looked into.

But this wouldn’t have served Trump’s purposes.

 

https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2018/08/another-strange-chapter-in-the-trump-sessions-saga.php

What if the National Football League Were as Corrupt as today’s Schumer Democrats?

Our Donald Trump Stars in Montana

Donald Trump Jr: Jon Tester is no partner of President Trump

https://www.greatfallstribune.com/story/opinion/2018/07/03/donald-trump-jr-jon-tester-no-partner-president-trump-rally-great-falls-montana/756781002/