• Pragerisms

    For a more comprehensive list of Pragerisms visit
    Dennis Prager Wisdom.

    • "The left is far more interested in gaining power than in creating wealth."
    • "Without wisdom, goodness is worthless."
    • "I prefer clarity to agreement."
    • "First tell the truth, then state your opinion."
    • "Being on the Left means never having to say you're sorry."
    • "If you don't fight evil, you fight gobal warming."
    • "There are things that are so dumb, you have to learn them."
  • Liberalism’s Seven Deadly Sins

    • Sexism
    • Intolerance
    • Xenophobia
    • Racism
    • Islamophobia
    • Bigotry
    • Homophobia

    A liberal need only accuse you of one of the above in order to end all discussion and excuse himself from further elucidation of his position.

  • Glenn’s Reading List for Die-Hard Pragerites

    • Bolton, John - Surrender is not an Option
    • Bruce, Tammy - The Thought Police; The New American Revolution; The Death of Right and Wrong
    • Charen, Mona - DoGooders:How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help
    • Coulter, Ann - If Democrats Had Any Brains, They'd Be Republicans; Slander
    • Dalrymple, Theodore - In Praise of Prejudice; Our Culture, What's Left of It
    • Doyle, William - Inside the Oval Office
    • Elder, Larry - Stupid Black Men: How to Play the Race Card--and Lose
    • Frankl, Victor - Man's Search for Meaning
    • Flynn, Daniel - Intellectual Morons
    • Fund, John - Stealing Elections
    • Friedman, George - America's Secret War
    • Goldberg, Bernard - Bias; Arrogance
    • Goldberg, Jonah - Liberal Fascism
    • Herson, James - Tales from the Left Coast
    • Horowitz, David - Left Illusions; The Professors
    • Klein, Edward - The Truth about Hillary
    • Mnookin, Seth - Hard News: Twenty-one Brutal Months at The New York Times and How They Changed the American Media
    • Morris, Dick - Because He Could; Rewriting History
    • O'Beirne, Kate - Women Who Make the World Worse
    • Olson, Barbara - The Final Days: The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House
    • O'Neill, John - Unfit For Command
    • Piereson, James - Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism
    • Prager, Dennis - Think A Second Time
    • Sharansky, Natan - The Case for Democracy
    • Stein, Ben - Can America Survive? The Rage of the Left, the Truth, and What to Do About It
    • Steyn, Mark - America Alone
    • Stephanopolous, George - All Too Human
    • Thomas, Clarence - My Grandfather's Son
    • Timmerman, Kenneth - Shadow Warriors
    • Williams, Juan - Enough: The Phony Leaders, Dead-End Movements, and Culture of Failure That Are Undermining Black America--and What We Can Do About It
    • Wright, Lawrence - The Looming Tower

Beethoven at the Weekly Standard

Breaking the Ice with Ludwig van Beethoven

by Gina Dalfonzo  at the Weekly Standard…..article sent by Mark Waldeland:

“Forgive me when you see me draw back when I would gladly mingle with you,” wrote Ludwig van Beethoven in the Heiligenstadt Testament, a letter he addressed to his brothers (and humankind in general) in 1802, but never sent. “My misfortune [deafness] is doubly painful because it must lead to my being misunderstood, for me there can be no recreations in society of my fellows, refined intercourse, mutual exchange of thought, only just as little as the greatest needs command may I mix with society.”

The Heiligenstadt Testament is a well-known document and has been exhaustively studied as one of the clearest windows we have into the composer’s thinking. And yet, Beethoven’s description of himself as a man who wanted “the society of [his] fellows” generally plays little part in the popular conception of him. On the contrary, we tend to remember him as deliberately, fiercely individualistic—an icon for those who prefer to go their own way, unconcernedly leaving the rest of humanity trailing in their wake. In fairness, Beethoven himself contributed considerably to his own reputation with his distinct lack of social graces, including a notorious carelessness about hygiene and a manner that could be abrupt to the point of rudeness. This helps to explain why posterity has tended to gloss over, or even ignore, his expressed longing for companionship. Yet Edward Dusinberre suggests that we shouldn’t, and he brings to the subject the perspective of a musician who has spent his life playing in one of the world’s great string quartets, the Takács. He takes his title from Beethoven’s rejoinder to critics who found his Opus 59 quartets too radical: “They are not for you, but for a later age!”

That might seem to go well with the portrait of Beethoven as an isolated genius against the world. Nonetheless, that’s not the Beethoven that Dusinberre hears after having worked for so many years on his quartets—arguably one of the most social forms of music……..”   Read on, there’s more below:

http://www.weeklystandard.com/breaking-the-ice-with-ludwig-van-beethoven/article/2006039?custom_click=rss?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=TWSAutoTweet

Among The Most Beautiful Assemblage of Human Noises Recorded!!

The Disappearance of Beauty in Mind and the English Tongue

Allan Bloom on American Nihilism and Its Degrading Vocabulary

“What would have happened if literature professors had continued to love literature, admire Shakespeare, and teach others to do the same? Perhaps if they had emulated Allan Bloom’s attention to words—if they’d taught writing and written well themselves—our colleges would not now be so enraged.

[ . . . ]

“Never Shall I Utter These Words”

Toward the end of Part Two, Bloom asks whether, if we Americans were forbidden to use all these words, we would be speechless. Alternatively, if we were deprived of the word “lifestyle,” would we say “living exactly as I please”? If stripped of “my ideology,” would we say “my prejudices”? If unable to say “my values,” would we, now naked and a touch ashamed, try to give reasons for our views and our choices, begin to know ourselves, and live seriously?

A couple of years ago, I was very pleased when the whole class studying Part Two took the pledge I offered, and solemnly swore, with a smile: “I shall never utter these words, but ever seek better ones, so help me God.”

What words might we seek? While Bloom’s exposure of the new words often includes better words, Americans can find plenty elsewhere as well. There remains the mighty fortress of the King James Bible, for instance, and the boundless treasury of Shakespeare.

In Shakespeare, you won’t find such words as lifestyle, ideology, or even entertainment in its shallow modern sense. The word “creative” does not appear, only creature, creation, and creator, for creativity was only recognized in “great nature” and nature’s God. The later philosophic sludge of “concept,” “objective” and “subjective,” and “fact” vs. “value” are not there to stymie our search for truth. Instead of “values,” you will find the exposure of their danger when the amorous Troilus defends the abduction of Helen: “What’s aught but as ’tis valued?” and is refuted by Hector: “value dwells not in particular will; / It holds his estimate and dignity / As well wherein ’tis precious of itself . . . ’Tis mad idolatry / To make the service greater than the god.”

The seven most common adjectives in Shakespeare are “good,” “great,” “fair,” “sweet,” “true,” “poor,” and “noble.” The use of “good” (2985 times) exceeds all others. When teaching Shakespeare, I challenge students to spend a week using such words, and no words not in Shakespeare. They get extra credit if they get some winsome Shakespearean word, like “romage,” into the Daily Dartmouth. How many knaves would be recognized and some restrained if we used the word as often as Shakespeare did? (247 times, to be exact.) Perhaps we would not have to suffer so many fools if we used “fool” too…….”   Please read on:

http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2017/05/19063/

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE BIBLE

The Bible’s Significance for the American Founders

article sent by Mark Waldeland:
juicyecumenism.com
The founders, whether Christian or not, believed that the Bible provided an important source of morality for the country. The enormous success of the American nation since the founding must thus be attributed in fair measure to its Biblical basis.
. . . Many people “knew the Bible from cover to cover.” Phrases and cadences from the King James Bible affected their language. It “shaped their habits of mind.” The Bible was “the most authoritative and accessible book” of eighteenth century America. Christian and skeptic alike appealed to the Bible in support of their arguments. The founders who drafted the Constitution appealed to Scripture more frequently than any other source. Dreisbach noted that scholar Donald Lutz has identified one third of the citations in the literature of the founders as being from the Bible.
(Please do read further by clicking above.)

America the Beautiful….from Johnny Carson to Stephen Colbert

From Johnny Carson to Stephen Colbert

by Dennis Prager at Townhall.com:

“In a monologue considered witty by teenagers, teenagers in adult bodies and those who hate President Trump, CBS “Late Show” host Stephen Colbert said about President Trump, “The only thing your mouth is good for is being Vladimir Putin’s c*** holster,” and “You’re turning into a real prick-tator.”

Witty?

Not to many of us.

And not just not witty but obscene, which is particularly disturbing because it was broadcast on network television, not cable television.

But more than anything, it exemplified a trend in American life that one could identify without any exaggeration as the unraveling of civil society. To anyone — liberal or conservative — who grew up watching Johnny Carson on late-night TV, the descent from Carson to Colbert is as breathtaking as it is heartbreaking.

Along with virtually every other American, I never knew Johnny Carson’s politics. I would not have been surprised if he was a liberal or a conservative, a Democrat or a Republican. In his 30 years as host of “The Tonight Show” on NBC, he never so much as hinted as to how he identified politically. He poked fun at whoever was in power.

The reason he didn’t let on where he stood politically is he believed that he had a much greater responsibility: to offer Americans of all political persuasions an island of good-natured fun, a place where all Americans could laugh together every night.

And, of course, it is inconceivable that he would have used the language Colbert used. Kids could watch “The Tonight Show” because he — and we — lived in a pre-left age, when grown-ups thought they had a responsibility to be good models to young people — in other words, a responsibility to be adults. But the left has never been comfortable with growing up.

Those who mock the Trump motto, “Make America Great Again,” who claim they don’t understand how anyone could think America was ever great, might begin to understand what many of us mean, in at least this one way: Prior to the Age of the Left, during which we have lived since the mid-1960s, there were places in America where Americans could enjoy life and one another without politics intruding, not to mention hate-filled politics like Colbert’s……..”

There’s more.  Dennis was just starting.   Please read on to know your today’s America better:

https://townhall.com/columnists/dennisprager/2017/05/09/from-johnny-carson-to-stephen-colbert-n2324008

Getting to Know the Outdoors Better

The Landscape Garden

“The garden has long been perceived as the highest, most perfect form of all art creations, the one closest to God and bearing the imagery of paradise itself. Indeed, the timeless quote, “One is closest to God in the garden,” has been the splendid pleasure driving countless generations to transform the land into garden. No matter how pleasurable, how physically and spiritually rewarding working the vegetable garden and nurturing the home orchard may be, however, the paradise of gardening is the creation and maintenance of a landscape garden. This is the garden of art, the garden of soul. A landscape garden is a plot of ground made beautiful by the arrangement and careful cultivation of plants. The art is called landscape gardening and its artist and cultivator a landscape gardener. Landscaping one’s home ground is the means by which most Minnesotans become acquainted with at least the fringes of the art of landscape gardening. When they dream of home it is a house in a setting, a setting of lovely trees and shrubs civilized with a carpet of lawn and an arrangement of beautiful flowers.

Landscape gardening is primarily a visual art form. Its beauty is first to be seen, but its purpose is to stimulate thought, to cause to dream, to effect memory, to inspire. The landscape garden is classically to be a place of quiet where the visitor, upon entering, finds a closer communion with the thoughts and feelings of all who have ever gardened this Earth than with the time and troubles of the day.

Although picturesque, the landscape garden is not a painting, it is a performance. Its artist is not a painter but a choreographer arranging not fixed colors and forms on a canvas, but directing exits and entrances of living members of Earth’s realm, plants bearing color and form, lines and textures which, especially in our northland, are constantly changing. Yesterday’s garden as yesterday’s ballet will never again be performed. Yet the skilled landscaper garden artist, by tailoring shrubs and trees to a particular style or by using annual flowers for sweeps of color, can slow change in the garden to give the impression of permanence.

The landscape garden is to be entered, as one enters a cathedral or library. In English literature one “retires” to or “withdraws” into the library, presumably to consult or escape with some thought, some dream, some memory, some inspiration in print. To aid withdrawal there must be border. The gardened place must be defined so the eye and mind cannot wander; so thoughts and dreams cannot be interrupted. With no borders the landscape garden is no garden at all, but a field.

The arrangement of plants is to the landscape gardener what the arrangement of chords is to the pianist. Although it is possible for a novice pianist to find a pleasing chord, one chord does not make a composition. Likewise, a novice gardener may plant a pleasing combination of flowers and shrubbery, but a landscape garden this does not make. “Composers” of the successful landscape garden know their plants. They know plants’ shapes and sizes and how these can be tailored to style. They know plant colors and textures and when and how they change. Garden artists know the sun and shadow of the garden and how to introduce or exclude either. They know plant preferences for shade, soil, and moisture. They gain their knowledge primarily from the experience of working with plants, from years of planting and replacing until the right combination suits the eye.

Not only must the successful landscape garden be designed and planted, it must be given time to mature. Gardens, like people, gain character with age. It may take years, decades before a landscape garden performs its best. Trees cannot yet be manufactured. And the garden must be groomed, regularly tended by caring, experienced hands, the hands of an artist, the hands of a worker. And even when all this is done well, what is achieved is an arrangement of living plants each and all subject to Nature’s mood and dictate, to stand or fall as Nature sees fit. A garden as planned is a garden never achieved.”

Recently, American hero, Dennis Prager, while listing a number of devotions occupying his time, admitted that he wasn’t into “the Garden”.  Yet, he is a very religious man, devoted to the Books of Moses.

The human soul has limited time to practice God’s  devotions in one lifetime.   Dennis Prager is urban, New York City tar and pavement whose parents were neither dependent upon, nor inspired by the power and beauty of vegetative seeds….seeds upon which the human animal of all sexes, shapes, colors, and sizes relies on for food, protection, inspiration,  and exquisite beauty.

The beautiful landscape garden in its finest forms, inspires the human soul, imagination, and devotion to the power of visual living matter.

There is not much time in our  human life’s calendar to do all things good and inspiring arising from ones soul……

I am a regular Dennis Prager fan and have been for more than a decade.  Being a Brooklyner, perhaps he is too urban, perhaps too urbane as well, to recognize the value of gardening the human soul with God’s Biblical  Truth and Beauty of   mind  and  behavior arises from the Garden of Eden…..and the touch and feel, that ONE IS CLOSEST TO GOD IN THE GARDEN.

Think of all the flowers, shrubs, and trees of the human  mind you are tending every day you share your sermons whether political, social, or religious.

 

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF BEAUTY IN OUR WORLD

IN TRAGEDY…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLcbfF9ypmM&index=6&list=RDOkHGUaB1Bs8

IN LOVE:……..https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HVjTPqe5I0

REGARDING LIFE:  As for man, his days are as grass;  “as a flower of the field, so he flourisheth.    For the wind passeth over it, and it is gone;  and the place thereof shall know it no more.”

Regarding Troubles of our Time: https://youtu.be/TKqVtXG8VOE